Monday, 21 December 2015

Arms Deal: EFCC Set To Question Goodluck Jonathan

The former president Goodluck Jonathan is set to undergo questioning from operatives of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) over the notorious arms deal scandal.

Reports suggest that the anti-graft agency may secretly write to the ex-president whose name it claims has consistently come up in the investigation into the scandal.

The former national security adviser, Col. Sambo Dasuki (retd.), was reported to have said he disbursed funds from his office based on the instructions of the former president.

An EFCC source said the agency has no plans to invite the former president but “we may write him to tell us his own side of the story because his name has been coming up in our investigations?” The Punch reports.

The agency claims it needs the clearance of the president to write to Jonathan.

In a related development, the EFCC may have concluded arrangements to invite some chieftains of the Peoples Democratic Party for questioning.

Those expected to be summoned are the former board of trustees chairman of the party, Chief Tony Anenih, a former deputy national chairman, Chief Bode George, and others who were alleged to have received part of the funds meant for arms procurement.

“You see, this is an investigation. In a situation like this, the commission has a thin chance of not inviting those whose names have been thrown up.

“They have to be invited to make clarifications; it does not necessarily mean that they have been indicted but it is only a standard procedure for them to appear to make clarifications where necessary.

“I think by now, Anenih, Bode George and all those who were mentioned during the investigation should have been invited but the commission has not been given the directive to pick them up.

“They know what they are doing. Anytime from now, possibly this week, they will be invited,” The Punch quotes an EFCC source as saying.

Meanwhile, the Nigerian federal government has said there is no need for frivolous plea bargains for those involved in the arms deal scam.