Friday, 5 February 2016

Boko Haram: Why FG must change tactics now – SGF

The secretary to the government of the federation (SGF), Babachir David Lawal, has urged the federal government to change tactics in its ongoing war against Boko Haram insurgents following recent attacks on soft targets by the insurgents.

Lawal said this yesterday, February 4, when he led a delegation in company of three cabinet ministers during a visit to Dalori village to condole with the residents of the area and assess the level of damage caused by Boko Haram terrorists.

He said: “When Boko Haram started, they were capturing and holding on to territories because the past government allowed it. Now, they are using explosive devices on soft targets because of the heat on them by our troops. This is a dangerous trend. In the battle against insurgents, we may need to change our tactics,” he said during a call on Governor Kashim Shettima.”

The SGF said the delegation who came on the orders of President Buhari would also assess the extent of destruction and make recommendations for the federal government to take appropriate action.

He urged the community to be more vigilant following the new tactics employed by the insurgents in launching attacks on soft targets.

He said: “Now what we have at hand is that these terrorists have adopted the use of explosives to attack, this means the battle against Boko Haram is no longer for the military, but for all of us.”

The recent Boko Haram attacks on Dalori village in Borno state was one of the deadliest in recent times, more than 100 people were reportedly killed by the terrorists in the attack. According to the Nigerian army, the insurgents used different ways to kill the innocent indigenes of the small village.

Meanwhile, the Nigerian military on Thursday, February 4 said that lack of funds hampered their fight against Boko Haram in 2015.

The statement was made by the nation’s service chiefs at a closed door meeting with the leadership of the Senate and the chairmen of committees relating to security agencies.